The world is crazier than most people know. But I know. I was a clinical social worker for forty years. I am a witness. I retired from social work to write about the sad, the mad, and the savage; with whom I have spent most of my life. I have decided to translate these stories into fiction, because, as a co-worker once said, "You couldn't make this sh*t up. No one would believe you."

Wednesday, September 19, 2012


To Be Free, or Not To Be....

from Lian


In Jane of the Jungle on page 2, Jane, a recent widow, throws over her previous typical life of caring for a beloved husband and working at a job to keep it all going:  

“Afterward I was drowning in medical bills and couldn’t pay the mortgage.  So one day I just up and quit my emergency nursing job and wrote several letters:  one to the bank, thanking them for the house and giving it back to them; one to the bill collectors suggesting they put their bills in their collective rectum; and one to my priest asking him to pray for my outlaw soul and vote Democrat in the next election.”

I am retired, after a long history of working at jobs where I always got rave job evaluations once a year and lots of sh*t from
bosses on a weekly basis.  Occasionally, it was deserved, but mostly it was a wife/husband who said no, being cut off in traffic, heartburn, a mouthy kid, or any of the number of things people in charge seem to bring to work with them. 

It makes me sad to think that being good at your work does not exempt one from being a target. 

How often as a wife, mother, worker, I wanted to do exactly what Jane did, to throw over my traces and run free.   I didn’t, having a child and a lack of courage at the time; but sometimes, when I am alone and quiet, I wonder what might have been. 

4 comments:

  1. I basically chose the freedom route and have no regrets. I worked as little as possible and only under favorable conditions-no evaluations, no weekly reports to submit, no boss standing over my head, no disgruntled fellow workers to contend with. My freedom and peace of mind always meant more to me than any money or prestige I could ever earn.

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  2. I admire and respect your choice and wish that at the time, I had the perspective and courage the decision you made requires. However, since I have retired, I do have freedom and peace of mind now. And none to soon I might add; I'm an old lady !! Lian

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  3. @NP: good for you, Marty!
    @Lian: now, if you could just find some money! :)

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    1. I did, I did !! I found two nickels, a dime and a quarter under the sofa cushions!! :-)

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